Teaching with Keynote: #4 Dual-coding with Shapes

Learning visuals such as icons, diagrams and images help students remember information. In Keynote students can draw around shapes and add handwritten notes to learn concepts and ideas. If students create visuals from memory (without notes), it can also be a great retrieval activity as they are recalling and conceptualising knowledge from memory.

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Teaching with Keynote: #3 Scaffold Screen-recorded Tutorials

Students can combine Keynote slides and screen recordings to create tutorial videos. To do this, provide a simple structure for students to follow by making a clear scaffold in Keynote. Screen-recordings are a simple and effective way for teachers to see and hear what students know about a topic. Provide blank slides for students to drop in their recordings.

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Teaching with Keynote: #2 Document a Process

Students can use Keynote to document a process with photographs. For example, students could show the process of photosynthesis, the process of building a bed-side table or the process of throwing a cricket ball. An image (or short video) on each slide supported with audio narration and text help children consolidate their understanding. 

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Teaching with Keynote: #1 Annotate & Animate

Students can use Keynote to animate their hand-written notes on top of an image and then add audio to explain their understanding. As we know from cognitive science, a combination of visual and verbal information allows students to retain information more effectively. Here’s a screen-shot example from a Science class.

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